Friday, November 23, 2007

After the Carnage

Most everybody was asleep yesterday by the time the turkey was actually done, and the Sweetie's dad actually slept through most of Thanksgiving dinner - jet lag. In spite of these challenges, I am proud to announce that the crew still managed to do some decent damage to it. The Sweetie's little brother used his Marine training ("They taught us how to butcher a goat") to carve the turkey and folks wandered dozily around the house gnawing on little bits of it.

It was declared good. If you interpret "munch munch mumble mumble snore" to mean good. Which I obviously do.

I sent some of the turkey home with the Sweetie's folks, and was left with approximately 95% of a 15 pound turkey - which translates to approximately 1000 pounds of leftovers. I did what any self-respecting cook would do - I stripped the meat off, threw it in plastic containers in the fridge and then put the carcass in the stock pot. Because we're not going to have enough to eat and we need soup.

Actually, turkey soup is one my favorite Thanksgiving memories. Some folks love the day-after turkey sandwiches, but for me, it was my Mommaw's turkey and wild rice soup.

So today, I got in there and separated all the meat from the bones. And I have the meatiest, tastiest soup stock this year that I've ever had! Could it be the brining? (Usually, I'm just making off with the carcass from someone else's house while they give me funny looks and say, "Sure. You can have it if you want it . . . . but are sure you dont' want to take any actual turkey with you?")

This year, though, the carcass started off at my house. And found myself looking at the bones with slightly different eyes. In the past, I've kept only the wishbone. This year, though, I set aside part of the spine, the breastbone, and what I think are the hipbones. I'm boiling the rest of the meat off of them now. The real question is, after the carnage, how do I prepare the bones for use in art? I was thinking about dumping them in bleach after they're done boiling and I also considered hanging them up outside all horror-movie style, but I'm really not sure on the best approach.

A Google search ("Google first, then ask stupid questions") for "preparing bones for use in art" turned up zilch. So now, I turn to you, my loyal readers, for any advice you may have . . .

5 comments:

Ann said...

Google "prepare skeleton display." You'll get stuff from museums - the first one that came up for me was about a snake skeleton and it looked pretty detailed.

Bridget Benton said...

Hmmm . . . apparently, I should have used flesh-eating beetles instead of boiling. Boiling did weaken the bones and cause some damage . . . they're drying now, and then I'll drop them in very mild bleach solution in a few days . . . Then they should be good to go . . . thanks, Ann!

gl. said...

good call, ann! bridget, when they took my wisdom teach out they dunked them in a bleach solution and put them in an envelope for me, so that's probably how i would have handled bones, too.

Su said...

Thanksgiving at Bridget's was wonderful, fantastic, and totally relaxing! The food was to die for. And she plays a challenging game of Scrabble, my favorite game!

Turkey bones? That's beyond me, but maybe I can mention the bones in the story I'm working on?

Bridget Benton said...

Su! Say hello to Su - The Sweetie's mother and romance novelist! Thank you for the lovely compliments, Su-Mom. And feel free to use any bizarre components of my life in your stories . . .

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